January 19, 2018
Arts & Entertainment
49° Partly Cloudy
  • Scott Jay, Deb Hoffman, Pat Troy and Steve Troy stand with an enlarged print of a 1930s Earleigh Heights fire truck, one of six photographs that will soon be displayed on the back of the Severna Park Center along the Baltimore & Annapolis Trail.
    Photos by Dylan Roche
    Scott Jay, Deb Hoffman, Pat Troy and Steve Troy stand with an enlarged print of a 1930s Earleigh Heights fire truck, one of six photographs that will soon be displayed on the back of the Severna Park Center along the Baltimore & Annapolis Trail.
  • An image of the Boro store from the 1920s is one of the six prints created by ASPIRE to hang along the Baltimore & Annapolis Trail, providing residents with an illustration of the town’s heritage and history.
    An image of the Boro store from the 1920s is one of the six prints created by ASPIRE to hang along the Baltimore & Annapolis Trail, providing residents with an illustration of the town’s heritage and history.

ASPIRE Preserves The Past With Photography Display

Dylan Roche
picture
View Bio
February 5, 2014

Severna Park will soon be home to a new, very special photography exhibit, one that reflects the community’s heritage and pays homage to the stories of decades past. But this exhibit won’t be coming to any museum or gallery – instead, it is coming right to the heart of town, where it will be displayed outside for everyone to see.

The project is part of a recently renewed effort by the Association for Severna Park Improvement, Renewal and Enhancement (ASPIRE) to illustrate local history while beautifying the area with artwork along the Baltimore & Annapolis Trail. In the coming months, 4-by-8 prints of photographs from early-20th-century Severna Park will go up along the recreational path for the enjoyment and education of natives and visitors alike.

“This will be such an asset to us to have a beautiful piece of work that’s not only of interest but also educational,” explained Pat Troy, executive director of ASPIRE. “So many people don’t realize how much history there is to Severna Park.”

ASPIRE originally set out to create the outdoor artwork design as part of Severna Park’s centennial celebration in 2006. Hoping to provide future generations with a vision of the past, ASPIRE and several other community organizations planned four murals, each depicting historical scenes, on the back of buildings that ran along the trail.

In 2007, local painter Cindy Fletcher Holden completed the first mural, a townscape of early Severna Park, on the back of the Carr building.

The plan was to continue the placement of the murals on the back of the Severna Park Center strip, the Rogge building and the Winkelmeyer building, and though costs and other challenges slowed the project, new methods have now made it possible for ASPIRE to continue its vision.

“It’s taken a while, but finally, technology has gotten to the point where the technique of painting the building is not the only way to do a mural,” Troy observed.

Instead of standard frescos, enlarged black-and-white photographs printed on vinyl will give the illusion of a giant old-fashioned album. Scott Jay, a member of ASPIRE and an expert on Severna Park’s history, provided six photographs from his collection. The pictures, dating back to the 1910s and 1920s, include images of Earleigh Heights fire trucks, the Boro store and other landmarks. Jay and Troy, along with Troy’s husband, Steve, and ASPIRE’s new president, Sandy Spadaro, then began the process of making the photo exhibit a reality.

Minuteman Press in Glen Burnie helped ASPIRE with scanning the photographs at high resolution and printing them on heavy-grade vinyl, which was then coated with a special treatment to make the prints extremely durable.

Similarly, Jenneill Delp, the owner of Severna Park Center, has supported and encouraged the project. Several residents may have already noticed the trail-facing side of the retail strip has been painted flat black to serve as a background for the photographs.

Deb Hoffman, owner of The Big Bean, has been another moving force in the project. Hoffman’s coffee shop has made use of the space along the trail by providing outdoor seating, and she expressed hope that making the area behind the building more attractive will encourage other business owners to do the same.

Jay indicated that the final, finished product will be as interesting as it is eye-catching, as it will show passersby what the area looked like in its early days. “It’ll be nice for people on the bike path to be able to see the history of Severna Park,” he said.

In the coming weeks, Jay will continue building the wood frames for the prints as he and other ASPIRE members await spring and warmer weather so they can mount the work. Soon enough, community members can look forward to the display that will further ASPIRE’s mission of preserving the past, celebrating the present and guiding the future. “We’re really excited to be finally entering the home stretch,” Troy concluded of the mural project. “Everything is all coming together now."


Sidebar Ad

Faces of the Voice

  • Dylan Roche
    Editor
    @dylroche
    @dylroche
    @dylroche
  • Larry Sells
    Vice President, Sales and Development
    @LarrySells1
    @LarrySells1
    @LarrySells1
  • Dianna Lancione
    Publisher
    parkiewoman
  • Lonnie Lancione
    Publisher
  • Brian Lancione
    V.P., Operations
  • Colin Murphy
    Sports Editor
    @ArVoiceSports / @ColinAJMurphy
    @SPVoiceSports / @ColinAJMurphy
    @PVoiceSports / @ColinAJMurphy
  • William Nauman
    Creative Director
  • Zach Sparks
    Assistant Editor
    @Sparks907
    @Sparks907
    @Sparks907

Latest Tweets

Events Calendar

Request an Advertising Quote

Please do not add dashes. (ex: 4106479400)
Do not enter anything here.
Search Articles
Search Authors
Search Blog